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Wednesday, July 3

  1. page Wireless Power edited What is Wireless Power? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Anyo…

    What is Wireless Power?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Anyone who attends a class or meeting where most of the participants have laptop computers is well aware that there are never enough power outlets—and when they are available, they are invariably located in inconvenient places. Wireless power, already being prototyped by several companies, promises to alleviate the problem by making power for charging batteries in devices readily available. Using near-field inductive coupling, power can be transmitted through special surfaces or even through open space to charge devices within a home, office, school, or other setting. Consumer products are already entering the market; the Powermat, for instance, charges up to three devices placed onto its surface (each device must first be slipped into a compatible sleeve). Fulton Innovation's eCoupled technology is designed to be built into desk- and countertops, enabling not only power transfer but other wireless communications between devices placed on the surfaces. Witricity is developing transmitters that would be embedded in walls or other furniture, transferring power via inductive coupling to receivers attached to devices anywhere within the home or classroom. The impact of wireless power for education will primarily be felt in learning spaces; the devices we carry will become more useful and easier to maintain, with increased opportunity for longer use in a variety of settings.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Oct 31, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    your response here
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  2. page WhatsNew edited What's New? The wiki is now open! If you are new to using this kind of wiki, see our Getting St…

    What's New?
    The wiki is now open! If you are new to using this kind of wiki, see our Getting Started guide.
    Welcome Advisory Board members! Please introduce yourselves via the discussion tab on the wiki main page.

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  3. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources. Some educators and students are seeking alternatives to course management systems, preferring to open their discussions and make use of a variety of tools instead. Aggregation can reunite course discussions that once took place within CMS forums, even if they are scattered among different platforms and tools. Aggregation can allow a class to visualize its conversations in new ways. Information is available when and where the reader wishes, in almost any desired format.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    your response here
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  4. page Wearable Technology edited What is Wearable Technology? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] …

    What is Wearable Technology?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Wearable technology refers to devices that can be worn by users, taking the form of an accessory such as jewelry, sunglasses, a backpack, or even actual items of clothing such as shoes or a jacket. The benefit of wearable technology is that it can conveniently integrate tools, devices, power needs, and connectivity within a user’s everyday life and movements. Google's “Project Glass” features one of the most talked about current examples — the device resembles a pair of glasses, but with a single lens. A user can see information about their surroundings displayed in front of them, such as the names of friends who are in close proximity, or nearby places to access data that would be relevant to a research project. Wearable technology is still very new, but one can easily imagine accessories such as gloves that enhance the user’s ability to feel or control something they are not directly touching. Wearable technology already in the market includes clothing that charges batteries via decorative solar cells, allows interactions with a user’s devices via sewn-in controls or touch pads, or collects data on a person's exercise regimen from sensors embedded in the heels of their shoes.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Feb 8, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Wearability is perhaps best understood as an extension of wireless and mobility technologies and so will reinforce the impacts that are identified for those. Augmented reality tools like Glasses or the others that will come from competitors will help further blur the line between the real world and the virtual, adding a continuous data overlay and set of services to real world activities. Educationally, I can imagine a future where information tools will monitor the environment of the user and provide a context and knowledge dependent information feed. Students in educational settings will have the equivalent of a real time continuous Google search reacting to things that they hear and see. The power of this search will reflect the extent to which it is contextualised by knowledge about the students previous use of information and search tools, and through links to cloud based repositories of their work. Cognitive tools like this will take information work into the space that digital calculators took mathematics, forcing teachers to teach skills and understanding that transcend access to facts. For teachers, imagine the ability of such tools to provide contextual information such as names, courses and grades, as well as any key warnings or messages, in real time as they encounter students. At the basic level they could look at a student in a lecture and facial recognition or near field/RFID detection of student IDs will tell them the student's name so they can ask them a question by name, more complex systems could integrate work done in other settings such as discussion forums and allow the staff member to integrate student questions or comments into the lecture in real time. Sounds like science fiction but these technologies are all real and I fully expect elements of this to be in place within the next five years.stephen.marshall Feb 15, 2013
    This seems to be the intersection of mobile learning, location-based learning, the Internet of things and augmented reality. Already some evidence of this is around in a basic sense, such as students undertaking assessments with camera glasses recording their performance of tasks, however, the fast advances in all the separate parts of technological development may produce wearable items which incorporate many of the topics we are commenting on. joanne.woodrow Feb 17, 2013
    This type of technology is a long way off for mainstream but I can see niche uptake e.g. for specialist research areas or use for students with special needs. For nich areas the timeframe is probably a lot closer. Uptake will depend very much on R & D funding maree.gosper Feb 21, 2013~
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    In addition to the possibilities Stephen has outlined, i believe that the potential of wearable technology extends the mobility of users/wearers and has the potential to also unlock us from fixed teaching spaces into the possibilities of learning in the real-world as well as allowing small groups to be engaged in a learning project anywhere where the connectivity is good. The possibility for learning designs where individuals locate information (interviews, photographs etc) on-site and push them to other members in real-time along and discuss as new items emerge. This would be a more natural discovery and share in real-time type of learning possibility. slambert Feb 17, 2013
    The short term potential is in supporting students with special needs. Longer term ... its hard to tell but will likely depend on uptake in the wider community and also cost. maree.gosper Feb 21, 2013
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    I have only so far seen "hoodies" with ipod earphones embedded and sold commercially but i'm sure the offerings will increase as the technologies can be embedded in a wider range of fabrics - and issues of 'can you wash it' be solved. slambert Feb 17, 2013
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  5. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]] Press Clippings: Publis…
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    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations.
    Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work.
    We'd love to see your clippings here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add more, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to identify items you think are of high interest to us, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters-- Sam Apr 14, 2011 (note - to keep the wiki clean, please put spaces on either side of your marks). This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.
    Recommended Reading
    5 Big Education Technology Trends of 2013
    http://edudemic.com/2012/12/the-5-big-education-technology-trends-of-2013/
    Among the trends identified by Edudemic staff are: 3D printing, universities offering free courseware, and social media to educate communities. jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013(items 1,3,5)gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 have I been around too long or is there really nothing much new here?
    5 School Technologies to Watch: Personalized Learning is Here
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ciocentral/2012/10/22/5-school-technologies-to-watch-personalized-learning-is-here/
    Founder of Schoology, a provider of classroom management software, lists what he thinks will be the technological innovations on the near-term horizon: cloud & collaborative environments, cross-platform integration, mobiles, adaptive learning, and gamification.jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013dirk.ifenthaler Feb 14, 2013gamification is lacking learning design, especially regarding assessment while game-play
    20 Coolest Augmented Reality Experiments in Education So Far
    http://www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2012/09/20-coolest-augmented-reality-experiments-education-so-far/
    "Augmented reality is exactly what the name implies — a medium through which the known world fuses with current technology to create a uniquely blended interactive experience. While still more or less a nascent entity in the frequently Luddite education industry, more and more teachers, researchers, and developers contribute their ideas and inventions towards the cause of more interactive learning environments. Many of these result in some of the most creative, engaging experiences imaginable, and as adherence grows, so too will students of all ages." gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 yey!dirk.ifenthaler Feb 14, 2013if integrated into a curriculum this is a first step towards more authentic learning environments (where the real workplace is not accessible)
    20 Tech Trends That Will Define 2013, Selected by Frog
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671397/20-tech-trends-that-will-define-2013-selected-by-frog#1
    Multidisciplinary engineering and design form predicts that 20 tredns that will affect telecommunications, healthcare, media, etc. Among them -- automated vehicles, more humanistic computers, more diverse data ecology, and more sophisticated interfaces.jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013 (only really "Apps become invisible", "Automated intelligence aids our digital doppelgangers", "We reached the tablet tipping point", and "Micro networks rise")
    Automated_intelligence_aids_our_digital_doppelgngersgillysalmon Feb 11, 2013
    25 EdTech Startups Worth Knowing
    http://edudemic.com/2012/10/25-edtech-startups-worth-knowing/
    Compiled by Edumemic in October 2012, these are 25 up-and-coming startups in the educational technology industry.
    2012 Technology Innovation Awards
    http://online.wsj.com/public/page/technology-innovation-awards-10162012.html
    Wall Street Journal's Technology Innovation Awards resulted in some very important inventions to improve quality of life and save lives worldwide, like " a tsunami barrier that automatically deploys when destructive waves approach." Check out the 37 winners.
    CEA: 5 Technology Trends to Watch
    http://content.ce.org/PDF/2K13_5tech_proof.pdf
    In October, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) released their annual list of technologies that are expected to influence the consumer electronics industry in the next few years. I agree with most of these technologies and have heard first hand from our students from Tanzania and Kenya about the importance of mobile devices, especially cell phones for communication and the deployment of education.
    Cisco's Prediction of 2013 Education Technology Trends: The Big Three to Watch
    http://blogs.cisco.com/education/ciscos-prediction-of-2013-education-technology-trends-the-big-three-to-watch/
    The leader of the US Public Sector Education at Cisco describes three edtech trend to watch for in 2013 -- The Internet of Everything, shared services, and cloud computing. jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013
    EdSurge's Top 10 Edtech Trends
    https://www.edsurge.com/n/edsurge-s-top-10-edtech-trends
    EdSurge has identified ten trends to watch this year such as "The Make movement" and "rise of teacherpreneurs." jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013 (especially 1-4) gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 beautiful except for the combined words
    The Education Revolution Continues: 4 Top Education Tech Trends for 2013
    http://networkingexchangeblog.att.com/enterprise-business/scanning-for-a-sign/the-education-revolution-continues-4-top-education-tech-trends-for-2013
    Lead Manager for Education Marketing at AT&T lists the 4 edtech trends we will see in 2013 -- game-based learning, personalized mobile learning environments, cloud-based collbaration, and the flipped classroom jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013
    Gartner: Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2013
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericsavitz/2012/10/23/gartner-top-10-strategic-technology-trends-for-2013/
    Gartner, the world's leading infotech research and advisory company, has compiled a list of the "10 critical tech trends for the next five years." They include a growing importance of mobile devices and cloud services, big data to fuel demand for IT jobs, and software and analytics strengthening the internet of things.gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 surprise! michael.coughlan Feb 14, 2013
    Major Ed-Tech Trends for 2013
    http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2013/01/23/major-ed-tech-trends-for-2013/
    In this infographic designed by onlinecolleges.net, 4 major trends are shown (they match Edudemic's) with a few more predictions regarding game-based learning, BYOD, open textbooks, and e-books.gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 bring on 2014 I saydirk.ifenthaler Feb 14, 2013
    Top 10 College Campuses for Tech
    http://mashable.com/2012/08/24/best-tech-colleges/#829831-Carnegie-Mellon
    Unigo, an online resource for college information, polled students at hundreds of colleges across the country and came up with the top 10 Wired Campuses list — as well as some interesting findings.
    Innovative Pedagogy 2012
    http://www.open.ac.uk/personalpages/mike.sharples/Reports/Innovating_Pedagogy_report_July_2012.pdf
    The Open University lists 10 trends from a UK online tertiary education perspective jason.maddern Feb 11, 2013 (especially 1,3,5,7,8)gillysalmon Feb 11, 2013 I quite like this but do we need to move away from the term 'pedagogy finally?? michael.coughlan Feb 14, 2013 (See The Larnaca Declaration on exploring a new language to describe good teaching practice.)dirk.ifenthaler Feb 14, 2013

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  6. page Visual Data Analysis edited What is Visual Data Analysis? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]…

    What is Visual Data Analysis?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Visual data analysis blends highly advanced computational methods with sophisticated graphics engines to tap the extraordinary ability of humans to see patterns and structure in even the most complex visual presentations. Currently applied to massive, heterogeneous, and dynamic datasets, such as those generated in studies of astrophysical, fluidic, biological, and other complex processes, the techniques have become sophisticated enough to allow the interactive manipulation of variables in real time. Ultra high-resolution displays allow teams of researchers to zoom into interesting aspects of the renderings, or to navigate along interesting visual pathways, following their intuitions and even hunches to see where they may lead. New research is now beginning to apply these sorts of tools to the social sciences as well, and the techniques offer considerable promise in helping us understand complex social processes like learning, political and organizational change, and the diffusion of knowledge.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Oct 31, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    your response here
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  7. page Virtual Worlds edited What are Virtual Worlds? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Vir…

    What are Virtual Worlds?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Virtual worlds garnered a tremendous amount of attention in 2006-2009, when millions of individuals created online avatars and institutions were developing building after building on designated plots of virtual land. In Linden Lab’s Second Life®, world-class universities hosted thousands of educational projects and experiments, from recreating historical spaces to replicating renowned museums and works of art. A lot of energy was devoted to building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and facilitating the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. The idea was that these environments could foster unique and immersive learning opportunities, doing so in a way that uniquely made people feel like that were together in the same place. While the hype around virtual worlds has waned in recent years, there are still compelling developments, mainly in the form of WebGL, a new way of rendering 3D objects in via a web browser, which has been applied in virtual worlds. CloudParty, a Facebook application, is a good example of the capability of WebGL, though it is more of a hangout space and does not have as strong a tie to learning as do other purpose-built spaces. Google is a leading player in academic WebGL technology, and its vast collection of user contributed “Chrome Experiments” range from an interactive timeline of satellite launches to a visualization of connected cells that enable people to create biologically-inspired patterns.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Oct 31, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Virtual world that seek to mimic real-worlds seem to me a collossal waste of resources. Flying around a virtual version of the Eiffel Tower has about 30 seconds of appeal before it gets boring. Nor does the 3D or 'reality' of setting add anything to a perfectly well designed flash-based lab simulation such as a virtual microscope or tsunami simulator. For syncronous chatting to friends, seeing a cartoon version of them has (again) 30 seconds of appeal before we reconsider Skpe. However, I consider that Virtual worlds may be useful as a support/platform to deliver learning designs that use role-based learning at their core. Role-based learning works really well in situations that are morally or ethically difficult, or where numerous competing perspectives need to be understood as part of developing problem-solving skills in unstructured, complex situations. For example, training engineers involved in river/dam management to negotiate water use in contested territories eg Gaza, Mekong delta. Training would-be school principlals in resource prioritisation involving complex stakeholder requests. In these role-plays, it is really useful if the student can take on the role of another person - to step inside their shoes and see what it is really like. It is also a safe learning environment to tackle difficult, high-risk tasks. For example, in a role-play set in a high school, if they are playing the role of "principal" and they don't do a good job of an interaction with a "parent of an aggressive student" - they can learn from it without having to worry about their personal safety. In such situations, putting a role play into a virtual world will create the anonymity required for students to really try lots of different approaches. In conclusion, while we consider virtual worlds as something unto themselves we are in trouble. When we think of them as supports to appropriate learning designs, we may find a perfect match that creates a great learning environment for a particular cohort of students. slambert Feb 20, 2013
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    As indicated from the lengthy response above, i think it would be good to note what Virtual worlds are not good for (see above), and what they are useful for. slambert Feb 20, 2013
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    Can be very effective in niche situations: roleplays of complex situations, and/or with ethical or moral dimensions and/or with multiple stakeholders with conflicting views. slambert Feb 20, 2013 For similar reasons, they are useful also for law students practicing legal advocacy, virtual "moots". slambert Feb 20, 2013
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Although a project in the K-12 space, PLANE (Pathways for Learning, Anywhere Anytime - A Network for Educators) is a virtual professional learning project. http://blog.plane.edu.au/category/news/
    joanne.woodrow Feb 21, 2013
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  8. page Virtual Assistants edited What are Virtual Assistants? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] …

    What are Virtual Assistants?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    As voice recognition and gesture-based technologies advance and more recently, converge, we are moving away from the notion of interaction with our devices via a pointer and keyboard. Virtual assistants are the natural end goal of natural user interfaces (NUI), and build on developments in interfaces across the spectrum of engineering, computer science, and biometrics. A new class of smart televisions will be among the first devices to make comprehensive use of the idea. While crude versions of virtual assistants have been around for some time, we have yet to achieve the level of interactivity seen in Apple's classic video, Knowledge Navigator . The Apple iPhone's Siri and Android's Jellybean are recent mobile-based examples, and allow users to control all the functions of the phone, participate in lifelike conversations with users, and more. Microsoft Research is devoting considerable resources to developing NUIs. Virtual assistants for learning are clearly in the long-term horizon, but the potential of the technology to add substance to informal modes of learning is compelling.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Oct 31, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    your response here
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  9. page Virtual and Remote Laboratories edited What are Virtual and Remote Laboratories? [[include component="page" page="Topic…

    What are Virtual and Remote Laboratories?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Virtual and remote laboratories reflect a movement among education institutions to make all the equipments and elements of a physical science laboratory more easily available to learners from wherever they are via the web. Virtual laboratories are web applications that emulate the operation of real laboratories and enable students to practice in a “safe” environment before using real, physical components. Examples include an optical networking virtual lab and a virtual lab for programmable logic controllers. Students can typically access virtual labs 24/7, from wherever they are, and run the same experiments over and over again. Some emerging virtual lab platforms also incorporate reporting templates that populate with the results of the experiments so that students and teachers can easily review the outcomes. Remote laboratories provide a virtual interface to a real, physical laboratory. Institutions that do not have access to certain high-caliber lab equipment can run experiments and perform lab work online, accessing the tools from a central location. Users are able to manipulate the equipment and watch the activities unfold via a webcam on a computer or mobile device. This provides students with a realistic view of system behavior and allows them access professional laboratory tools from wherever they are, whenever they need. Additionally, remote labs alleviate some financial burden from institutions as they can forgo purchasing specific equipment and use the remote tools that are at their disposal.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Feb 8, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Not sure if this fits here or elsewhere. The education sector I know best is Teacher Education. We have been doing some work with digital recorders, webcams, skype, facetime, webinar software to connect the university with classrooms to (1) observe student teachers at work, (2) observe master teachers at work, (3) observe learner behaviour. Not new ideas but as the technology, connectivity and bandwidth improves we believe this has real potential to improve theory/prac nexus and change aspects of professional experience especially allowing students to observe , in real time, master teachers at work. geoff.romeo Feb 18, 2013
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  10. page Twitter edited Horizon Report in Twitter Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Rep…

    Horizon Report in Twitter
    Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Report.

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